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Meet Our Kids 2012

No one tells the story of a hospital experience better than the child who went through it. Here are just some of those stories from children who participated in Radiothon and our annual WMAR-ABC2 Special for Johns Hopkins Children's Center in 2012.

Virus Leads to a Heart Transplant for Bridget

Bridget Diveley -tNo parents want to hear that their child needs a heart transplant. For the Diveley family of Middle River, this nightmare became a reality after their perfectly healthy 2-year-old daughter, Bridget, came in contact with a common virus. Learn More About Virus Leads to a Heart Transplant for Bridget


Connor's Brain Tumor Begins with Arm Numbness

Connor_ThumbThings were going well for the Fique family from Hampstead, Md., until the summer of 2011 when, within a matter of weeks, everything abruptly changed. It started when four-year-old Connor said his arm kept falling asleep. Learn More About Connor's Brain Tumor Begins with Arm Numbness


Desirae Overcomes Compartment Syndrome after Broken Arm

DesiraeKids will take tumbles and sometimes sprain an ankle or break a bone in the process. For Desirae Myers of Salisbury, Md., an injury from a fall during cheerleading practice seemed relatively routine, until doctors at Hopkins Children’s discovered a potentially life-threatening complication. Learn More About Desirae Overcomes Compartment Syndrome after Broken Arm


Cooling Baby Dominic to Prevent Brain Injury

Dominic1When Dominic Herrick was born full term at Anne Arundel Medical Center, he appeared limp, had difficulty breathing, and began experiencing seizures shortly after being transferred to the NICU. The medical staff recognized the symptoms of birth-related brain injury and quickly began treatment with medicine and body cooling. The physicians recommended transfer to another hospital with expertise in critical neonatal medicine. Learn More About Cooling Baby Dominic to Prevent Brain Injury


Donna Recalls Surgery 60 Years Ago that Saved Her Life

BluebabythumbMore than 60 years ago, Donna Steiner underwent a pioneering surgery at Johns Hopkins to repair a heart defect called tetralogy of Fallot, one of the most common congenital malformations of the heart. The defect causes inadequate blood flow from the heart to the lungs and profound lack of oxygen in the blood, giving an infant's skin its hallmark bluish hue, hence the name “blue baby” syndrome. Learn More About Donna Recalls Surgery 60 Years Ago that Saved Her Life


Eli Beats Hirschsprung’s Disease and Malrotated Bowel

ElijahJust after Elijah Sponseller was born Nov. 9, 2009 at Howard County General Hospital, he was admitted to the NICU for labored breathing. Doctors’ concerns grew when the newborn failed to have a bowel movement and instead threw up after feeding. Less than 48 hours after his birth, Elijah was diagnosed with malrotated upper bowel, or twisted intestines. This condition occurs in about 1 in 500 newborns and can be life-threatening if not treated and corrected promptly. Learn More About Eli Beats Hirschsprung’s Disease and Malrotated Bowel


After Surviving a Brain Tumor, Emily Thrives in College

EmilyPowell2Emily Powell came to Johns Hopkins Children’s Center when she was 10 years old after being diagnosed with a rare brain tumor. Though the waiting list for renowned neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson was a year long at the time, he found time to see Emily within two weeks of her diagnosis and performed a life-saving, 11-hour surgery to remove the cancerous growth from Emily’s brain within a month. Learn More About After Surviving a Brain Tumor, Emily Thrives in College


Erin Overcomes Challenges of Treacher Collins Syndrome

ErinRichmondWhen Erin Richmond was born at Franklin Square Hospital in Baltimore County on May 20, 1986, she had no external ear or ear canal on both sides of her face. She was also missing bones in her face and had a severely underdeveloped bottom jaw. Because of her small airway combined with the underdeveloped jaw, her tongue blocked the airway when she slept. Learn More About Erin Overcomes Challenges of Treacher Collins Syndrome


POTS Diagnosis Helps Unravel the Yarborough's Mystery Illnesses

HYarboroughHana Yarborough, age 12, is treated at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center for postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), a disorder marked by abnormal blood circulation and blood flow to the brain and heart when standing up from the lying position, causing severe lightheadedness, fainting and a rapid heart rate. In Hana’s case, however, POTS may be the answer to a medical mystery that has shadowed her family for generations, and one that doctors at Hopkins Children’s have recently started to unravel. Learn More About POTS Diagnosis Helps Unravel the Yarborough's Mystery Illnesses


Holly Litchicum: An Ongoing Medical Mystery

Born with epilepsy, global developmental delays, and a suspected genetic disorder, Holly has been a patient at Hopkins since she was 7 weeks old. With a wide array of mysterious symptoms, she has been a quintessential Hopkins case. To treat Holly, the doctors at Hopkins Children’s put together a multidisciplinary team that tackled each of her problems in tandem. The team includes gastroenterologist Dr. Ann Scheimann, neurologist Dr. Adam Hartman, and Dr. Ronald Cohn in Genetics. Learn More About Holly Litchicum: An Ongoing Medical Mystery


Biliary Atresia Patient Justus May Not Need Liver Transplant

justus2Tiffany was pregnant with her fifth child when she went into premature labor at 34 weeks. At the hospital in Portsmouth, Va., she was told that she was dilated and needed bed rest. But, intuitively, she knew something was not quite right. A few days later, she asked her then 15-year-old daughter to drive her to the naval hospital in Norfolk, where on April 1, 2010, she gave birth to her son, Justus. Learn More About Biliary Atresia Patient Justus May Not Need Liver Transplant


Surgeon Repairs Lyndsay's Club Feet

Lindsay KatzLyndsay was born in 2002 with club feet, a congenital deformity in which one foot or both feet are rotated inward at the ankle. Her parents’ immediate first question was “Is this fixable?” The doctors nodded “Absolutely.” Learn More About Surgeon Repairs Lyndsay's Club Feet


Michael's Leukemia Diagnosis Follows Congenital Heart Defect

Michael CoburnTwo days after Michael Coburn was born, doctors discovered that he had hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare condition in which the left side of the heart is not fully formed. Babies born with the condition have an underdeveloped left ventricle, aorta, mitral and aortic valves. In order for him to receive the care he needed, Michael would need to be transported to a hospital in Virginia, the doctors told his parents. Michael’s dad, however, insisted that his son be taken to Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. Learn More About Michael's Leukemia Diagnosis Follows Congenital Heart Defect


A Peek Inside Our NICU

DominicNowhere is life as fragile as it is in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)and nowhere is it as resilient. Many of our tiniest preemies and most critically ill term babies fight for life and grow up to be healthy children, then adults. Such success stories are as much a testament to these infants’ resilience as they are evidence of the superb skills of our neonatologists, pulmonologists, surgeons, cardiologists, neurologists and gastroenterologists. But above all, behind every sick baby in the NICU who grows to be a healthy child, there is a dedicated, talented and loving nurse. Learn More About A Peek Inside Our NICU


Parents Team with Doctors and Nurses to Care for Patients

pfcc logoBob Seipel and his family moved to Baltimore to receive care at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center after one of their children, William, was diagnosed with congenital cerebral palsy with devastating brain insult and neuro-developmental deficits. Learn More About Parents Team with Doctors and Nurses to Care for Patients


Beginning Life in the NICU

woodsBorn at 27 weeks during Hurricane Irene, these twins would begin their lives in the neonatal intensive care unit at Hopkins Children's. Learn More About Beginning Life in the NICU


Robbie's Bladder Exstrophy Repair

Robbie MorleyIt was an emotional roller coaster ride for a Kansas City couple expecting their first child. The pregnancy was treated as high-risk after a growth was discovered on the baby’s head; a growth that could mean brain damage. Learn More About Robbie's Bladder Exstrophy Repair